Recent Storm Damage Posts

Winter Prevention Tips

1/10/2019 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Winter Prevention Tips Being pro-active can save you thousands of dollars in damages.

Winter Prevention Tips: Roof - Check for loose or damaged shingles that may leak. If you had lots of icicles last year, have an energy auditor identify air leaks and poorly insulated areas in your attic.Windows & Doors - Apply caulk to all gaps to prevent water intrusion and stop air from entering your home.Gutters - Remove debris from gutters which can prevent water from draining. Also, extend your downspouts so water runs at least 3-4 feet away from your foundation. Exterior Faucets & Sprinklers - Turn off water source at the shut-off valve, disconnect any hoses, and drain all lines to prevent pipes from bursting during a freeze.Winter Supplies - Make sure you have your snow shovels and ice scrapers handy. Stock up on salt or ice melt before you need it. If using a snowblower, have it serviced now to be ready for the season.If you do happen to have frozen pipes or water in your home, our trained technicians can make it "Like it never even happened."

Mold-The Result of the Summer Storms

10/2/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Mold-The Result of the Summer Storms Mold in this basement from the recent flooding. Mold is the byproduct of wet basements.

f you have mold on the walls in your home then it's usually easy to remove. If the wall is non-porous then you can simply wipe the mold away using a wet cloth. You can also use a mold killing product if you like.

However, if the wall is porous, such as unpainted drywall, then you will usually need to cut away the wall where the mold is growing. This is because mold grows inside the material, instead of just on the surface, and so you can't remove it completely. 

Mold on Drywall Walls

Because drywall is a substance high in cellulose, it is one of the most common materials mold grows on in the home. As there is no practical way to completely remove mold from drywall, you will have to cut out and dispose of any drywall you discover which has mold growing on it.

Mold Growing Behind Walls

Mold commonly grows out of sight behind walls in the wall cavities. These spaces often contain pockets of humid, moist air. Mold can also grow hidden behind wallpaper. Wallpaper glue can hold organic debris, which can then become a food source for mold growth.

To find hidden mold behind walls you need to use invasive inspection methods and, optionally, mold testing. It's best to talk to a professional mold specialist in this case.

Mold on Ceiling

If you see mold on the ceiling in your home then you probably have a humidity or condensation problem. It is also possible that the mold is caused by a water leak above the ceiling. 

Like with mold on walls, if the ceiling is made of a non-porous material then you can usually just wipe the mold away with a wet cloth. You can use a mold-killing product like bleach if you like too.

If the ceiling is made of a porous material though, like unpainted drywall, then you may have to cut away the material where the mold is growing since the mold has probably grown inside the material.

Mold Growing Above Ceiling

Just as mold grows behind walls you can also sometimes find mold growing on the other side of ceilings. Mold colonies growing above ceilings are usually fed by water from a leaking roof.

For clues that mold could be growing above the ceiling in your home look for signs of water damage in the ceiling. Small patches of mold growth visible from under the ceiling can be a sign that there is a large colony of mold on the other side.

Mold in Floor

Mold can grow beneath the floor in your home just like it grows above ceilings and within wall cavities. Dirt and dust, which fall under the floor, become trapped, along with moisture, leading to perfect conditions for mold growth.

Tiles and especially carpets trap large amounts of dust and can become a haven for mold growth. Carpets hold moisture particularly well, taking a long time to dry out, which means they can very easily foster mold growth if there are spilled liquids, water leaks or floods.

Mold in Insulation

Insulation can be a reservoir for mold. Any insulation, which you can see exposed in your home, should be checked thoroughly for mold, especially if there was once a water problem in that particular room, or if there was once mold growth anywhere in the room. Even if the insulation looks clean at first glance make sure to thoroughly examine and inspect it.

If you do end up finding any mold in the insulation inside your home you will have to remove and replace the affected insulation as it will be impossible to completely clean all the mold out from it.

Mold in Air Ducts and HVAC

Unseen mold could also be lurking in vents; ducts, air conditioning and heating systems in your home so don't forget to check inside these areas when you're looking for mold.

Mold on Clothes

Mold can grow on the clothes in your home if they've been left wet for a long period of time. Clothes sitting in a wet pile for more than a day after being washed, or damp clothes left wet for more than a day while waiting to be washed can become moldy.

Mold Growing in Basement

Out of all the rooms in the house the basement is usually the most likely to contain mold growth. Because the basement is usually lower than any other room in the house it is often damp from water leaks flowing down into it. The cold temperature of the basement can also create a lot of moisture from condensation. To add to this basement is often dark, is rarely attended and the air in the basement is usually stagnant from poor ventilation.

Mold often grows on the wooden walls, posts or building frames in a basement. From there mold can spread along the wood and up into the other rooms of the house. Over time the mold can also weaken the frames and beams, which it grows on and slowly eats away at.

To check if there's a mold problem in your basement look for signs of water or dampness. Also if flooding has occurred or there are water leaks in or near your basement then there's a high chance mold could soon begin to grow.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is Northeastern Pennsylvania leader in mold remediation. 

Flash Flood Alerts-Lackawanna County

9/17/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flash Flood Alerts-Lackawanna County Florence is upon us. If your basements floods like this one, call SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge

The National Weather Center has issued a flash flood watch for Lackawanna County. With the ground already saturated, flooding will occur easily.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge has been extremely busy dealing with flooded basements from this unprecedented stormy summer.  This rain is certainly not needed and will most certainly cause additional damage to homes and businesses through the county. 

One benefit of SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is our ability to partner with other local franchises to ensure that your home or business is being mitigated and restored by IICRC certified companies and qualified restoration professionals. No disaster is too large.

if your home or business experiences water damage from this most recent storm call Lackawanna Counties leader in smoke, fire and water damage cleanup and restoration at (570) 235-1646. SERVPRO is "always here to help."

Flooding Safety Precautions

9/11/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flooding Safety Precautions This hotel experienced an indoor flood during the recent heavy rains.

lood Hazard: Terms and Steps to Take After a Flood to Safely Get Back into Your Home

The following terms are commonly used to describe a potential flood hazard:

Flood Watch: Flooding is possible. Keep up to date regarding flood risk by watching the local news, listening to the radio or using the internet.

Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible so identify and be prepared to move to higher ground and keep up to date regarding flood risk by watching the local news, listening to the radio or using the internet.

Flood Warning: Flooding either is occurring or will be occurring. Depending on the projected severity of the flooding, evacuation may be advised. If evacuation is advised, follow the recommended evacuation plan.

Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring. Move to higher ground and if possible find shelter.

If a flood occurs, a building damaged by water intrusion can be dangerous if the proper precautions are not taken. Common hazards after a home has water damage are:

  • Electrical Hazards: If the power is on, do not enter a building that is flooded or water damaged. If electrical circuits have gotten wet, have the power turned off at the main breaker or fuse box and call a licensed electrician.
  • Structural Damage: If the structure or foundation is damaged, do not enter the home. Be sure to look carefully before entering the home and leave immediately if the structure looks, feels or sounds unstable.
  • Hazardous materials: Items such as pesticides, fuel, oil, gasoline, asbestos or lead based paint may have been brought into the home or spilled as a result of the flood damage and should be cleaned up using proper precautionary measures.
  • Injuries: Injuries can occur after flood damage, such as slipping and falling, being struck by falling objects, lifting heavy objects, broken bones and cuts that occur while cleaning up are common when cleaning up a home that has flood damage.
  • Bacteria and Virus can be brought into a home that has flood water. Standing water can enable mold growth.  Exposure to any of these biohazards can be dangerous to your health.

Safety Precautions Should be Taken if Working in a Home with Flood Damage

  • Wear the appropriate personal protective equipment (“PPE”): The appropriate types of hats, safety goggles, gloves and a face mask should be worn.
  • Stay alert and be cognizant of your surroundings: It is important to stay alert and to continually be on the lookout for potential hazards and hazardous materials.
  • Protect yourself from bacteria and viruses: Wear a mask, do not eat or drink in the house, wear gloves and wash your hands frequently.
  • Be careful when lifting heavy objects.
  • Get help when dealing with hazardous materials: Do not remove or touch hazardous materials without the help of a qualified professional. If you suspect hazardous materials are present, call your local health or fire department.

Rain Rain Go Away

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Rain Rain Go Away Heavy thunderstorm have lead to flash flooding and flooded basements throughout Northeastern Pa.

Northeastern Pennsylvania has experienced what seems like several weeks of rainy days. From a consistent light rain to violent thunderstorm leading to flash flooding, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is extremely busy helping home and business owners making it "Like it never even happened".

These storms have wreaked havoc in the region overwhelming sump pumps, backing up sewer systems and leading to flooded basements. Most times a homeowners insurance policy will NOT cover outside water in leading to thousands of dollars of out of pocket expenses and the secondary damage as a result of improper cleanup is yet untold.  If your basement does take water install a sump pump. And with sump pump purchased the sump pump failure rider on your homeowners policy as a  safeguard to situations like this.

Another tip to protect your property is to add the sewer and drain backup to your policy as well. While normally there is a limit, all category 3 water (sewage), should be professionally cleanup which is not inexpensive. As I have written before, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" a it's always better to be safe than sorry.

Flash Flooding

7/27/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flash Flooding Flash flooding caused the Scranton basement to flood.

Flash flood: A flood caused by heavy or excessive rainfall in a short period of time, generally less than 6 hours. Flash floods are usually characterized by raging torrents after heavy rains that rip through river beds, urban streets, or mountain canyons sweeping everything before them. They can occur within minutes or a few hours of excessive rainfall. Last night parts of Lackawanna County again experienced heavy rains that caused flood like conditions. If your basement in your home or business suffered water damage either from the excessive water or from a sewer or drain back-up, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge can help. Any external water has the capability to include harmful components and it is recommended that it should be professionally dried and treated. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge has the trained technicians to ensure that your home or business is returned to a safe and healthy living and working environment. We are the Scranton areas leader in flood damage restoration and are available 24/7 at (570) 235-1646.

Wide Spread Flooding

7/27/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Wide Spread Flooding The recent heavy rains throughout Lackawanna County have caused many water related issues including this indoor flood at a Scranton business.

SERVPRO of Carbondale / Clarks Summit / Old Forge responds immediately to your flood and storm damage emergencies. We have the storm damage restoration experience and specialized equipment to restore your Scranton home or business back to pre-storm condition. From wide spread flooding to lighting striking your property.
When a storm hits your Lackawanna County home or business, you need help immediately. Our 24/7 response will help prevent secondary damage and help reduce business interruption costs. 
In addition to our own resources, we can access equipment and personnel from over 1,650 Franchises across the state and country. We can even call upon strategically located Disaster Recovery Teams for catastrophic storms and major events.That way you know your home or business is being dried by certified water technicians.
We live and work in this community too; we might even be neighbors. As a locally owned and operated business, SERVPRO of Carbondale / Clarks Summit / Old Forge is close by and ready to respond to your flood or storm damage emergency in the Northeastern Pennsylvania area.. We are proud to be an active member of the Scranton community and want to do our part to make our community the best it can be.
So when a storms hits, call Lackawanna Counties leader in smoke, fire and water cleanup and restoration at (570) 235-1646

Bombogenesis

1/5/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Bombogenesis If this happens to you, call us.

BOMBOGENESIS:

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is in the midst of addressing the prevalence of burst pipes throughout Northeastern Pa. Unfortunately this extreme weather pattern will continue for the next few days exasperating the problem. When this extreme weather pattern changes early next week, we will see a increase in the number of burst pipes. It’s not the freeze but the thaw that causes the disaster.

It is possible that we are unaware of any frozen pipes until it is too late. Whether it be a dishwasher, an infrequent used bathroom or a washing machine, sometimes we are unaware. As proactive as we may be, sometimes things happen and SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is here for those times.

We are available 24/7 to respond to any water disaster resulting from this storm. We have the experienced water restoration technicians and specialized equipment to help make it "Like it never even happened”. We are proud to serve our local Lackawanna county community.

Travelers Insurance- What to do after an Disaster

9/25/2017 (Permalink)

Great information from Travelers Insurance regarding what to do after after a disaster:

While most people think about preparation and what to do during an emergency, few people consider what needs to be done after a disaster occurs. The fact is, once an emergency has passed, the danger is not necessarily over. First, you need to survey your property for hazards and secure it right away to help prevent injuries or further property damage. This can help to expedite the rebuilding process. The following tips can help with your recovery following an emergency event.

  • Make sure everyone is safe. Stay tuned to local authorities until an official "all clear" is given. If you were evacuated, return only after authorities advise it is safe to do so.
  • Look for broken glass and sharp objects, and avoid downed power lines. Never touch anything in contact with power lines, including water or puddles that may be near the downed lines.
  • If warranted, have a qualified individual check for gas leaks or electrical system damage. Report any problems to the applicable utility companies right away.
  • Protect your property from further damage. Arrange for reasonable temporary repairs. Board up broken windows to help protect against vandalism or additional weather damage. Take photos of the damage and save all bills and materials receipts. Do not make permanent repairs until the insurance adjuster has reviewed the damage.
  • Throw out questionable food. Discard any food that has come in contact with contaminants, such as flood water. If the power is out, make sure to leave the freezer and refrigerator closed to keep food cold for as long as possible.
  • Report your claim immediately. The sooner you call your insurance carrier, the sooner they can respond. Be sure to speak to a claim professional before hiring a contractor to make permanent repairs. When choosing a contractor, select one who is licensed.
  • Refuel portable generators with caution. Turn off the generator and let it cool down before refueling. Fuel spilled on hot engine parts could ignite.

http://travl.rs/2xvGsd9

5 Things Facility Managers Should Know About Preparing for a Natural Disaster.

9/11/2017 (Permalink)

Courtesy of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA): We have just experienced two major hurricanes here in the United States over the last several weeks, and are sure that there will be more natural disasters in our future. The responsibility for preparedness is a whole-community approach that rests on the shoulders of many stakeholders.  Each segment of the community has a role in prevention, mitigation, response, continuity and recovery that can be addressed in a holistic manner.  Facility managers are a vital cog in this chain. NFPA 1600, Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs, one of NFPA’s most widely implemented standards, establishes a common set of criteria that sets a foundation for disaster management, emergency management, and business continuity programs using a total program approach (plus the PDF version of this standard is free to download!). Here are five things to consider as you prepare, respond, and recover from a major hurricane:   1) The most important thing to do is prepare and know you are part of a larger community and you need to help each other.  As outlined in chapter 5 of NFPA 1600, Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity/Continuity of Operations Programs conduct a risk assessment, business impact analysis, and resource needs assessment before the event occurs. This will give you an idea of what you are facing and what you will need prior to the event.  2) Know your stakeholders; These are the people that utilize your facility every day. Poll them to know what their plans are and let them know what yours are. Keep track of those that are staying and make sure to account for anyone with access and functional needs. 3) Talk to your neighbors; keep track of local emergency management’s instructions and follow them. If you have capabilities and services to offer, let them know. Also, if you have resource needs, let them know. Being a good neighbor for others may save the life of one of your stakeholders or that of one of your neighbors in the event of a disaster. 4) Communicate;  As early as possible, activate your plan and make sure that your stakeholders are aware of it.  Assure that they know their roles and expectations if any.  If you are operating a facility that is a critical infrastructure location, make sure that your on-duty staff have (to the best of their ability) secured the safety of their family and pets so that they can focus on the tasks at hand. Be sure that your support of this effort is communicated to them.  For more see NFPA 1600 Annex K.5.) Trust the plan, but don’t let it hold you back; Even the best and smartest emergency preparedness planner can’t think of everything, and we know that mother nature isn’t interested in their best intentions.  Your plan may be a script, but you will need to be flexible and make decisions and improvisations based on the need of the event.   At the end of the day remember:   

  • The time of the emergency is not when you should be exchanging business cards for the first time with your local partners. 
  • Take care of you and your own first, so you can focus on the rest. 
  • All plans and activities are fluid and dynamic based on the needs of the event.    

How to Reduce Flood Damage

8/9/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage How to Reduce Flood Damage A broken water pipe filled this business with water damage in Scranton, PA

Flood season is quickly approaching-Preparedness is the key.

BUILD WITH WATER-RESISTANT MATERIALS

Water-resistant materials can withstand direct contact with floodwaters for at least 72 hours without being significantly damaged and sustaining little more than low cost or cosmetic repair, such as re-painting.

DRY FLOOD-PROOF YOUR PROPERTY

  • Dry flood proofing protects the building by “sealing” the building so flood waters can’t enter:
  • Applying a waterproof coating or membrane to exterior walls.
  • Installing watertight shields over all openings, including windows and doors.
  • Anchoring the building to resist flotation.
  • Strengthening walls to withstand flood water pressures and flood debris.
  • Install a sump pump and foundation drain system.

ADD A WATERPROOF VENEER TO EXTERIOR WALLS

Protect your property from shallow flooding by adding a waterproof veneer, a brick backed by a waterproof membrane is one example, and sealing all the openings.

RAISE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Raising electrical system components above the anticipated flood level will help prevent damage to the electrical system and helps avoid the potential for fire from short circuits in flooded systems. All components should be raised at least 1 ft. above the 100-year flood level.

ANCHOR FUEL TANKS

Unanchored fuel tanks outside your property can damage your building or be swept downstream, damaging other properties. The supply line to an unanchored tank in your basement can tear free and fuel can contaminate your basement. Make sure that fuel tanks are properly anchored.

RAISE OR FLOODPROOF HVAC EQUIPMENT

Floodwaters can extensively damage heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) equipment. The extent of the damage depends upon the depth of flooding and how long the equipment is underwater. A good way to protect the HVAC equipment is to move it to an upper floor or build a flood proof wall around the equipment.

INSTALL SEWER BACKFLOW VALVES

Flooding in some areas can cause sewage from sanitary sewer lines to back up through drain pipes. Backflow valves are designed to block drainpipes temporarily and prevent return flow into the house.

PROTECT WELLS FROM CONTAMINATION BY FLOODING

Floodwater that enters a well can contaminate it and make the water unsafe to drink. A licensed well drilling contractor can inspect your well and suggest improvements

SERVPRO Disaster Response Team

7/27/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage SERVPRO Disaster Response Team A sea of green on a Sunday morning following a recent storm event in Scranton.

When a natural disaster strikes it can be all too easy to lose hope in light of severe damage and loss. Whether it’s a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood – the SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help fast.

No Disaster Is Too Big
The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge smoke, fire, water and flood cleanup professionals are prepared for the unpredictable.

With the ability to mobilize local command centers, along with the resources of more than 1,700 Franchises nationwide, no disaster is too big.

 Recent mobilizations of the Catastrophic Storm Response Teams include:

  • 2014 Polar Vortex
  • 2012 Sandy
  • 2010 Nashville floods
  • 2008 Ike
  • 2007 Chicago floods
  • 2007 Ohio floods
  • 2007 California wildfires
  • 2005 Katrina/Wilma/Rita

Should a catastrophic storm strike, call (570) 235-1646. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is the Lackawanna County's leader in flood and storm cleanup and restoration. We proudly serve the local Scranton community even in the face of a disaster, SERVPRO  of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge flood cleanup professionals will strive to help make it "Like it never even happened."

Disaster Response-Large Loss Capabilities

7/27/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team:

The SERVPRO Commercial Large Loss Division is composed of our best of the best in restoration. Our elite large-loss specialists are prequalified and strategically positioned throughout the United States to handle any sized disaster.

Every large loss is supervised by a commercial operations manager to help ensure seamless communication and timely mitigation.

At SERVPRO, the difference is our ability to dispatch trained production professionals and manage to cut costs through the strategic placement and oversight of temporary labor. Get the professionals, call SERVPRO.

Clients for the Commercial Large Loss program include:

  • The Hospitality Industry
  • Property Managers
  • Universities
  • Municipalities
  • The Pentagon

Our elite large-loss specialists are standing by, prepared for immediate response should a disaster strike. If your business suffers a major loss, call (570) 235-1646, and we’ll help make it “Like it never even happened.”

When disasters strike, know SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge can handle any size job. We serve all of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Disasters are our specialty. We are always "Here to help".

How to Reduce Property Damage from Flooding

7/26/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage How to Reduce Property Damage from Flooding Flood waters cause severe damage in this commercial property in Scranton

Were you affected by the recent flooding? Be prepared with these tips.

BUILD WITH WATER-RESISTANT MATERIALS

Water-resistant materials can withstand direct contact with floodwaters for at least 72 hours without being significantly damaged and sustaining little more than low cost or cosmetic repair, such as re-painting.

DRY FLOOD-PROOF YOUR PROPERTY

  • Dry flood proofing protects the building by “sealing” the building so flood waters can’t enter:
  • Applying a waterproof coating or membrane to exterior walls.
  • Installing watertight shields over all openings, including windows and doors.
  • Anchoring the building to resist flotation.
  • Strengthening walls to withstand flood water pressures and flood debris.
  • Install a sump pump and foundation drain system.

ADD A WATERPROOF VENEER TO EXTERIOR WALLS

Protect your property from shallow flooding by adding a waterproof veneer, a brick backed by a waterproof membrane is one example, and sealing all the openings.

RAISE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Raising electrical system components above the anticipated flood level will help prevent damage to the electrical system and helps avoid the potential for fire from short circuits in flooded systems. All components should be raised at least 1 ft. above the 100-year flood level.

ANCHOR FUEL TANKS

Unanchored fuel tanks outside your property can damage your building or be swept downstream, damaging other properties. The supply line to an unanchored tank in your basement can tear free and fuel can contaminate your basement. Make sure that fuel tanks are properly anchored.

RAISE OR FLOODPROOF HVAC EQUIPMENT

Floodwaters can extensively damage heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) equipment. The extent of the damage depends upon the depth of flooding and how long the equipment is underwater. A good way to protect the HVAC equipment is to move it to an upper floor or build a flood proof wall around the equipment.

INSTALL SEWER BACKFLOW VALVES

Flooding in some areas can cause sewage from sanitary sewer lines to back up through drain pipes. Backflow valves are designed to block drainpipes temporarily and prevent return flow into the house.

PROTECT WELLS FROM CONTAMINATION BY FLOODING

Floodwater that enters a well can contaminate it and make the water unsafe to drink. A licensed well drilling contractor can inspect your well and suggest improvements. 

Assess and Recover from an Indoor Flood

7/25/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Assess and Recover from an Indoor Flood When a storm causes indoor flooding at this commercial property in Moosic, PA, we were called to restore the business.

Indoor flooding can cause thousands of dollars worth of damage to your home, and it's a nightmare to clean up. Here's what to do when you notice water damage and how to safely begin the process of remediation.

The longer water is allowed to stand, the more severe the damage will be. You must respond to a flooding crisis quickly and efficiently.

Check for Danger

Before doing anything, ensure the damaged area is safe to work in. Your main concern is electrical danger. As you approach water damaged area, check for light fixtures and appliances that may have been damaged before, during or after the flood.

Be sure hot wires are not exposed as you begin to assess damage. If there is any risk of shock exposure, immediately turn off the power to the building and resolve the danger first.

Identify the Source

Water damage can come from three general sources:

  • Category I is clean, potable (drinkable) water. This is water comes from an overflowing sink, bathtub, broken water supply line or a fixture shut-off valve. This is the preferred source should water damage occur, since it poses minimal risk of contamination or respiratory danger.
  • Category II water is sometimes called "gray" water. It is not drinkable, but also not full of sewage. Category II water can include dishwasher run-off or washing-machine run-off. These sources contain soap and/or food contaminants but not raw sewage.
  • Category III water, sometimes called "black" water, is highly contaminated. It contains bacteria or chemicals harmful to touch, consume or inhale. Category III water must be removed by a professional with proper immunizations and personal protective equipment. Category III water can include any type of sewer back-up, water that has run across open ground before entering the structure, or anything related to a chemical spill.

Stop the Source

If the water is Category I or II, your next step is stopping the source. (If Category III, wait for a professional.) Be sure you know where your main shut-off valve is for your home's water supply and test it yearly to ensure proper function. If your leak is coming from an appliance or fixture with a shut-off valve, turn this valve off instead of the water to the entire building.

If a large amount of sewage is coming out of a drain line continuously there is a blockage in the sewer line or the municipal sewer system is malfunctioning in your entire neighborhood. Immediately call your city's wastewater department and report the issue. They need to respond immediately to prevent the flow of sewage.

Prevent Further Damage

After you have identified and stopped the source of the water, take swift action to prevent further damage to household items and materials. This can include:

  • Furnishings: Immediately relocate furnishings immersed in water or sitting on damp flooring. This is especially important for wood furnishings, or those that have a stain finish prone to bleeding. Nothing ruins carpet quicker than bleeding, wet furniture. Also, furnishings made from wood composite, like MDF, will swell quickly when exposed to water, and are impossible to dry to their original look and strength.
  • Wall Coverings: Once the furnishings are out of the way, inspect the walls. If water has wicked up the drywall or plaster, immediately remove baseboards, wainscoting or wall-coverings. Water gets trapped behind these items and creates a barrier to drying, which creates a great spot for mold growth. Mold begins to grow on porous surfaces after 48-72 hours of dampness. If you encounter mold, cease your demolition and hire an expert. This is especially critical if you have children, seniors, or those with medical conditions in your home. Do not disturb the mold, as this releases spores into the air. Leave the drywall in place if no mold is present, it may be salvageable.
  • Flooring: Once furnishings are removed and wall-finishes are stripped to drywall, you can address the flooring. As a general rule, carpet and cushion (pad) damaged with Category I water can be cleaned and salvaged. Carpet cushion damaged by Category II water needs to be disposed, but the carpet can be sanitized and salvaged. Flooring damaged by Category III water needs to be disposed of immediately and the slab or sub floor treated with an anti-microbial chemicals. Again, leave this to the experts. It takes proper training to safely remove flooring damaged to this extent.

Set Up for Successful Drying

Drying a water-damaged building requires knowledge and tools most homeowners rarely need. You'll probably want to contact a restoration company to assist with moderate to heavy drying.

If you have light water damage, you may be able to deal with it yourself. Place floor fans approximately 12′ along the room(s) perimeter, pointing the airflow in a clockwise direction. This creates a vortex with the air, pushing the air to the outside of the room.

If you have access to a dehumidifier, place it on the perimeter of the room to capture this moisture. Be sure to run the condensate line from the dehumidifier to a drain or out of the building. Releasing the condensation into a bucket in the room just creates more moisture in the room and slows drying.

If you had a Category I loss, and the carpet is wet, pull it from the tack strip and attempt to blow air under the carpet if possible. Light damage should dry overnight using this method.

That should all get you started—remember, the worse the flood is, the more important that you get some help from a professional. While you're at it, check out why flood insurance is a good idea for your basement or storm-prone apartment. 

Flood Damage Emergency Tips

7/24/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flood Damage Emergency Tips Heavy rains caused this recent flood damage in Scranton, PA.

WATER DAMAGE EMERGENCY TIPS:

After any water damage situation, your primary focus should be safety first:

Is it safe to stay in the house?
Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!
Have A  Water Damage Emergency? Call (570) 235-1646

What To Do After Flooding
Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding
Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
Don't use television or other household appliances.
Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is the Scranton leading water fire and smoke restoration and mitigation provider. Call us at (570) 235-1646 if you should experience a water emergency. Disaster occur and we respond 24/7/365.

Residential Roof Tarping in Scranton

7/21/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Residential Roof Tarping in Scranton Following a recent storm, our emergency services team was called by the insurance company to tarp this Scranton residence home.

Due to the recent storm that affected Lackawanna County, the SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge emergency services team responded to this home in Scranton. Roof tarping and board-ups are two services that we provide on a 24/7/365 basis for both individuals and insurance companies. Both the tarping and board-ups act as security measures to prevent secondary damage and add a level of safety to the home or business.

SERVPRO of Carbondale / Clarks Summit / Old Forge is locally owned and operated—so we live and work here too, and are proud to be part of the Clarks Summit community. We are also part of a national network of 1,700 with special Disaster Recovery Teams that can respond with additional resources during catastrophic storms and major events.

We are proud to serve our local Lackawanna County community. If your home or business experiences a smoke, fire or water emergency disaster call us at (570) 235-1646.

Flood Tips

7/14/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flood Tips Flood damage from a recent rainstorm to this basement in Dickson City.

Have A  Water Damage Emergency? Call (570) 235-1646

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is the Scranton's area leader in water cleanup and restoration. AS an IICRC certified company we employ certified water restoration technicians and specialized equipment to dry your home and business. At SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge we help make it "Like it never even happened."

Basement Flooding

7/12/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Basement Flooding Following a recent heavy rain storm, this basement in Scranton flooded when the sump pump failed. SERVPRO of Carbondale to the rescue.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge, Scranton areas premier smoke, fire, water and mold cleanup and restoration company. Being located in Taylor, PA we are centrally located to service the Lackawanna County area when heavy rains and storms cause basement flooding and emergency water damage. We are independently owned and operated we are proud to serve the Scranton area. from Taylor to Waverly, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is here to help. No disaster too big.

Whether it be a pipe break, supply line split or storm damage call the Lackawanna Counties mitigation specialists at SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge at (570) 235-1646. As an emergency services company we respond 24/7/365 to help make it "Like it never even happened."

Commercial Flooding

7/12/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Commercial Flooding Following a recent rainstorm, this manufacturing facility experienced an indoor flood when the sump pump was deluged with massive amounts of water.

Following a recent rainstorm, this manufacturing facility in the city of Scranton,experienced an indoor flood when the sump pump was deluged with massive amounts of water and shut down causing this situation. Sump pump failures are all to uncommon during heavy rains and the water backup becomes problematic for homes and businesses.

SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks-Summit/Old Forge, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area's premier water and flood mitigation and restoration company, was on the scene within an hour to begin the process of returning this property back to a safe and healthy working environment. Our water certified technicians extracted the standing water and were able to dry the structure with limited secondary damage. It is recommended to call a professional mitigation company like SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge to better ensure that the mitigation process is completed to IICRC standards.

Emergency Services

2/27/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Emergency Services Tarping of a residential roof and boarding up of damaged windows of this home in Dunmore following a rare tornado which blew through Lackawanna County

Following a recent rare tornado which blew threw Northeastern Pa., SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge was called by the insurance company to provide emergency services to their insured. This home in Dunmore was directly affected by the 120mph winds which severely damaged both the roof and windows.Two of the services we provided were the tarping of roofs and boarding up windows and doors.

Following any disaster, the homeowner has the responsibility to both secure and minimize any secondary damage. As Lackawanna County's leading emergency services company SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge can respond 24/7/365 to ensure that the homeowners needs are met. Keep your home or business safe and  secure following any disaster. Reduce your risk by calling us at (570) 235-1646. 

Storm Damage

8/23/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Storm Damage Mold is a secondary by-product of storm and water damage.

 With any extreme weather event like the recent flash flooding in the Scranton area, there will always be secondary damage that occurs. These photos are of the subsequent mold damaged that occurred once the water receded.
Mold is a by-product of water damage and as you can see comes in many shapes and colors. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge was called by the homeowners to remediate the mold so that the home could be restored to a safe and healthy living environment.
The storm damage affected a wide area of Lackawanna County and SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge was able to help many home and business owners to properly dry and restore their properties. Returning both families and employees to safe working and living environment is our number one goal in dealing with any fire, water or mold emergency.
If your home or business suffered storm damage and needs a professional restoration company in the Scranton area call us 24/7 at (570) 335-2143. 

Flash Flooding

8/17/2016 (Permalink)

lash flood: A flood caused by heavy or excessive rainfall in a short period of time, generally less than 6 hours. Flash floods are usually characterized by raging torrents after heavy rains that rip through river beds, urban streets, or mountain canyons sweeping everything before them. They can occur within minutes or a few hours of excessive rainfall. Last night parts of Lackawanna County again experienced heavy rains that caused flood like conditions. If your basement in your home or business suffered water damage either from the excessive water or from a sewer or drain back-up, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge can help. Any external water has the capability to include harmful components and it is recommended that it should be professionally dried and treated. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge has the trained technicians to ensure that your home or business is returned to a safe and healthy living and working environment. We are the Scranton areas leader in flood damage restoration and are available 24/7 at (570) 235-1646.

Wide Spread Flooding

8/16/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Wide Spread Flooding Flooding at a commercial building in Scranton

 SERVPRO of Carbondale / Clarks Summit / Old Forge responds immediately to your flood and storm damage emergencies. We have the storm damage restoration experience and specialized equipment to restore your Scranton home or business back to pre-storm condition. From wide spread flooding to lighting striking your property.
When a storm hits your Lackawanna County home or business, you need help immediately. Our 24/7 response will help prevent secondary damage and help reduce business interruption costs. 
In addition to our own resources, we can access equipment and personnel from over 1,650 Franchises across the state and country. We can even call upon strategically located Disaster Recovery Teams for catastrophic storms and major events.That way you know your home or business is being dried by certified water technicians.
We live and work in this community too; we might even be neighbors. As a locally owned and operated business, SERVPRO of Carbondale / Clarks Summit / Old Forge is close by and ready to respond to your flood or storm damage emergency in the Northeastern Pennsylvania area.. We are proud to be an active member of the Scranton community and want to do our part to make our community the best it can be.
So when a storms hits, call Lackawanna Counties leader in smoke, fire and water cleanup and restoration at (570) 235-1646

Preparedness Begins with a Plan

8/12/2016 (Permalink)

Storm damage happens and as the Scranton's area leader in smoke, fire and water damage, SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge believes in being prepared for "whatever happens". Following the recent widespread flooding in Lackawanna County and the amount of water damage that homes and business's suffered, now is the time to address how prepared you were. The next flooding event will occur will you be ready? Let SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge help your business be better prepared for the next weather event with a SERVPRO Emergency Readiness Plan.

This ERP should be part of any business continuity and emergency preparedness plan your business currently has. This free assessment allows you to have  help in the palm of your hand. Contact us today to get started. (570) 335-2143.

https://ready.SERVPRO.com/home/readyprogram

Storm Damage

7/27/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Storm Damage Storm damage was extensive throughout Lackawanna County

Pictured here is our crew cleaning up some of the damage from Monday's storm. The damage from a series of thunderstorms across Lackawanna County was extensive. The deluge of water was too much for some roofs, foundations and sewer systems, causing extensive flooding throughout. Any flooding (water from outside coming into a building) is considered contaminated water and thus category 3. When the water comes from the sewer system, it could become a health issue. Professional mitigation companies like SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge are called to return the structure to a safe living and working environment. Don't try cleaning up the damage yourself; we have highly trained crew who dry and clean to IICRC and OSHA standards to maximize the health and safety of all involved.

Importance of a Sump Pump

6/21/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Importance of a Sump Pump The recent storm caused heavy rains and this sump pump simply could not handle the deluge of water.

When a severe storm hits, homeowners may experience excess water in their basements or the lower levels of their home. A sump pump is an important tool that can help protect your property by controlling water and keeping your home dry.

Sump pumps are typically found in the lowest part of a house, such as a basement, and are usually installed by a professional in a specially constructed sump pit. The sump pump’s primary job is to pump water outside and away from the home. There are generally two types of sump pumps: pedestal and submersible.

How to Keep Your Sump Pump in Good Condition

Once installed, consider the following maintenance tips to help ensure your sump pump is ready when you need it.

Check the pump at least once a year to make sure it is still in good working condition.

  • Is the sump pump plugged in?
  • Is the power cord in good shape?
  • Is the drain hose connected properly?
  • Is there any debris in the area that could clog the pump and prevent it from working properly?
  • Pour water into the sump pit to test if the sump pump starts up automatically and quickly drains the water.

Since sump pumps run on electricity, consider installing a battery backup to help ensure yours will not fail, even in the event of a power outage. If you have installed a battery backup, during your test of the sump pump installation, unplug the pump to ensure that it will function properly on battery power.

Contact a professional if your sump pump is not working properly.

Finally, consider obtaining optional coverage for water backup or sump discharge or overflow. Many homeowners' policies do not cover water in the basement.

If your home or business does experience a water emergency, call Lackawanna County's premier water restortaion company at (570) 235-1646. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is an IICRC certified firm available 24/7 to serve the greater Scranton area.

https://www.travelers.com/resources/home/maintenance/sump-pump-maintenance.aspx?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=agentsocial&utm_content=|week1|SumpPum

Flooding safety precautions

2/18/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Flooding safety precautions A commercial property in Scranton, Pa. suffered a busted sprinkler pipe causing this flooding.

Flood Hazard: Terms and Steps to Take After a Flood to Safely Get Back into Your Home

The following terms are commonly used to describe a potential flood hazard:

Flood Watch: Flooding is possible. Keep up to date regarding flood risk by watching the local news, listening to the radio or using the internet.

Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible so identify and be prepared to move to higher ground and keep up to date regarding flood risk by watching the local news, listening to the radio or using the internet.

Flood Warning: Flooding either is occurring or will be occurring. Depending on the projected severity of the flooding, evacuation may be advised. If evacuation is advised, follow the recommended evacuation plan.

Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring. Move to higher ground and if possible find shelter.

If a flood occurs, a building damaged by water intrusion can be dangerous if the proper precautions are not taken. Common hazards after a home has water damage are:

  • Electrical Hazards: If the power is on, do not enter a building that is flooded or water damaged. If electrical circuits have gotten wet, have the power turned off at the main breaker or fuse box and call a licensed electrician.
  • Structural Damage: If the structure or foundation is damaged, do not enter the home. Be sure to look carefully before entering the home and leave immediately if the structure looks, feels or sounds unstable.
  • Hazardous materials: Items such as pesticides, fuel, oil, gasoline, asbestos or lead based paint may have been brought into the home or spilled as a result of the flood damage and should be cleaned up using proper precautionary measures.
  • Injuries: Injuries can occur after flood damage, such as slipping and falling, being struck by falling objects, lifting heavy objects, broken bones and cuts that occur while cleaning up are common when cleaning up a home that has flood damage.
  • Bacteria and Virus can be brought into a home that has flood water. Standing water can enable mold growth.  Exposure to any of these biohazards can be dangerous to your health.

Safety Precautions Should be Taken if Working in a Home with Flood Damage

  • Wear the appropriate personal protective equipment (“PPE”): The appropriate types of hats, safety goggles, gloves and a face mask should be worn.
  • Stay alert and be cognizant of your surroundings: It is important to stay alert and to continually be on the lookout for potential hazards and hazardous materials.
  • Protect yourself from bacteria and viruses: Wear a mask, do not eat or drink in the house, wear gloves and wash your hands frequently.
  • Be careful when lifting heavy objects.
  • Get help when dealing with hazardous materials: Do not remove or touch hazardous materials without the help of a qualified professional. If you suspect hazardous materials are present, call your local health or fire department.

How to Protect your Home in Extreme Cold Weather

2/16/2015 (Permalink)

Extreme cold weather can be hard on both you and your home. Here are some tips to put into practice when freezing weather, snow, and ice hit your area.

How to Deal with Frozen Pipes

  • Disconnect and drain garden hoses.
  • Cover outside faucets with insulating foam covers.
  • Turn off water to outside faucets, if available, and open valves on faucets to allow them to drain.
  • Turn off sprinkler system and blow compressed air through the lines to drain them.
  • Close or cover foundation vents under house and windows to basements.
  • Close garage doors.
  • Insulate exposed pipes (both hot and cold) under house with foam pipe insulation.
  • Open cabinet doors under sinks.
  • Drip hot and cold faucets in kitchen and bath. Drip single control faucets with lever set in middle.
  • Set icemaker to make ice if the water line to it runs under the house.
  • Don’t forget to check on pipes to your washing machine in the laundry room
  • Locate water main cut-off valve, and have a cut-off key handy.
  • Use a hair dryer, heat lamp, electric heat tape, or a portable space heater to thaw frozen pipes that have not burst.
  • Keep the faucet open when thawing frozen pipes to allow water to begin flowing through it.
  • After the weather has warmed above freezing and any frozen pipes have thawed, turn off dripping faucets and monitor your water meter to check for unseen leaks.
  • How to Keep Warm in Your Home

  • Have your furnace inspected before cold weather arrives. Inspect the heat exchanger for cracks, install a clean air filter, and check the thermostat to see if it’s working properly.
  • Inspect fireplaces, and chimneys before using, and have them cleaned if needed.
  • Keep drapes and blinds closed, except when windows are in direct sunlight.
  • Put up storm windows, or install sheet plastic window insulation kits on the inside of windows.
  • Cover or remove any window air conditioners.
  • Insulate electrical outlets and switches on exterior walls with foam seals available at home centers.
  • Caulk any cracks or holes on the outside of your house.
  • Repair or replace weather stripping and thresholds around doors and windows.
  • Run paddle-ceiling fans on low in reverse (clockwise when looking up) to circulate warm air.
  • Put draft snakes on windowsills, between window frames, and against doors.
  • If you heat with propane or fuel oil, make sure the tank is full.
  • If you heat with wood or coal, have plenty of fuel on hand.
  • How to Protect the Outside of Your Home

  • Clean your gutters and downspouts before cold weather arrives to prevent ice from forming in them.
  • Spray an ice repellent solution on steps and walks before freezing weather arrives
  • Check antifreeze levels in cars. Add if needed, then run the engine to circulate the new antifreeze through the radiator and engine block.
  • Add freeze resistant windshield wiper fluid, and spay to circulate it in lines.
  • Check air pressure in tires, since cold weather causes the pressure to lower.
  • Bring in container plants, add mulch around plants, and cover plants that are prone to frost damage. Remove covering when temperatures warm above freezing.
  • Drain birdbaths and fountains
  • Gently sweep snow off plants and shrubs in an upward motion with a broom.
  • Use rock salt, sand, or clay-based kitty litter on walks and drives (NOTE: Salt can damage grass and other plants).
  • Don’t overdo it when using a snow shovel.
  • Stay off your roof during freezing weather, but once the ice and snow have melted, inspect your roof for any damage.
  • How to Stay Safe in an Ice or Snow Storm

  • Stockpile nonperishable food and water.
  • Refill prescription medications in advance of storm.
  • Fill car with gas.
  • Charge cell phones.
  • Have flashlights, batteries, a weather radio, and a manual can opener on hand.
  • A portable generator can come in handy when the lights go out, but take precautions to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning when using.
  • Make sure you have working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and the batteries powering them are fresh.
  • Have a working fire extinguisher on hand for emergencies.
  • A chain saw can come in handy for removing broken limbs after an ice storm.
  • SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre premier disaster response company proudly serves all of Lackawanna, Luzerne, Wayne and Wyoming counties. We want everyone to #BeSERVPROSafe 

    Ice Dams

    1/28/2015 (Permalink)

    Ice dams. These icicles on your roof may appear harmless – and may even look pretty – but they can cause damage to your home. Here’s what you need to know about protecting your house from ice dams.

    What is an ice dam?

    An ice dam is a wall of ice that forms at the edge of the roof, typically at the gutters or soffit, and prevents melting snow from draining off.

    What causes ice dams?

    For an ice dam to form, 3 things must be present:

    1.     Snow on the roof

    2.     Higher portions of the roof’s external surface must be above 32°F

    3.     Lower surfaces must be below 32°F

    When these factors are in play, snow will melt and the water will flow down the roof and eventually freeze – forming an ice dam.

    Poor ventilation and temperature control in the attic can also lead to ice dams. Excessive warm air in the attic can cause the snow on the roof to melt regardless of the temperature outside. Recessed lighting, skylights, complex roof designs and heating ducts in the attic can all increase the chances of an ice dam developing.

    Do icicles mean that you have an ice dam?

    In short, no. It’s common for small icicles to form; the larger, thicker icicles are the culprits. When you notice the larger icicles, it’s important to act fast in order to prevent damage.

    What are the signs that you have an ice dam?

    These are the most common, according to the Ice Dam Company:

    1.     Your home has a history of ice dams

    2.     Icicles form on the edge of the roof or off the front edge of the gutter

    3.     Ice is coming through the soffit

    4.     Ice is forming behind the gutters

    5.     Water or ice appears on the exterior wall

    6.     Water is seeping through a door frame or window

    What type of damage can ice dams cause?

    If not addressed early, ice dams can cause significant damage. Here’s how:

  • Water from melting snow can seep into your house and into walls, ceilings, insulation and other interior areas.
  • Ice dams can lift roof shingles up, allowing water to leak inside your home.
  • Pressure and weight from the dams can pull off gutters and lead to structural damage that can cause flooding.
  • If attic insulation gets wet, it can become ineffective, plus mold can develop.
  • How to prevent ice dams:

    Consider these precautions.

  • Have your gutters cleaned before winter.
  • Keep your attic well ventilated, so it stays cold, and properly ventilate the roof and eaves.
  • Insulate the attic floor to reduce the amount of heat rising from within the house.
  • Rake or shovel snow off the roof before it freezes or hire a professional roofer to clear your roof.
  • Create an air barrier between the house and attic with a foil-faced cover over an un-insulated attic hatch or whole-house fan opening.
  • Install a water-repellent roof membrane.
  • Check for any potentially dangerous heat sources, including un-insulated recessed ceiling can lights, un-insulated folding attic stair openings, heating ducts, furnace or water-heating equipment and inadequate bathroom vent fans.
  • How to remove ice dams:

    If an ice dam has formed, here are immediate steps you can take to help prevent further damage.

  • Apply calcium chloride or another ice-melting product onto the ice.
  • Place a box fan in the attic and direct it at the underside of the roof where water is leaking in. The cold air will freeze the water.
  • If your roof is flat or has a low slope, use a sturdy push broom with stiff bristles to sweep off the snow.
  • Have a professional remove the dam with high-pressure steam or other specialized methods.
  • When it comes to removing snow or repairing ice dam damage on your roof, always consider your personal safety.

    Large Loss capabilities

    1/27/2015 (Permalink)

    SERVPRO Storm Damage Cleanup & Restoration

    Disaster Recovery Team

    When a natural disaster strikes it can be all too easy to lose hope in light of severe damage and loss. Whether it’s a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood – the SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help fast.

    No Disaster Is Too Big
    The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are prepared for the unpredictable.

    With the ability to mobilize local command centers, along with the resources of more than 1,600 Franchises nationwide, no disaster is too big.

    Recent mobilizations of the Castastrophic Storm Response Teams include:

    • 2012 Sandy
    • 2010 Nashville Floods
    • 2008 Ike
    • 2007 Chicago floods
    • 2007 Ohio floods
    • 2007 California wildfires
    • 2005 Katrina/Wilma/Rita

    Should a catastrophic storm strike, call (570) 235-1646. SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge proudly serves Scranton, Clarks Summit, Carbondale, Forty Fort, Tunkhannock, Old Forge, Jessup, Throop, Taylor, Peckville, and surrounding areas.

    Even in the face of a disaster, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals will strive to help make it "Like it neve

    Winter Weather Preparation

    12/5/2014 (Permalink)

    Storm Damage Winter Weather Preparation Storm damage which in which SERVPRO was called to do the tarping and board up service.

    Winter is a volatile season for weather. Depending on where you reside the type and degree of preparation you need to address winter weather may vary. In the south east or southern California, you will not likely have to prepare for severe blizzards, but cold, often freezing weather may still occur. For most of the U.S, preparing for winter weather involves preparing for ice and snow. The blizzard that struck the northeast U.S yesterday and the severe storms that hit before the holidays are examples of how important preparing for winter storms is. From transit shutdowns and road closures to widespread power outages or just arctic temperatures, winter is a trying time and requires ongoing preparatory measures. Here is a brief look at a couple of steps you can take to better prepare yourself for the bitter cold weather.

    Maintain a Consistent Temperature Inside

    Keeping your home a consistent temperature during the worst of the cold weather will help prevent pipes from freezing and ensure that your appliances continue to function well. Furnaces, water heaters, and plumbing lines all need to be used regularly during the winter to maintain functionality. If you are away for long periods during the winter, make sure to set your thermostat to a consistent, warm temperature. Even though you are not around, it is important to keep your home heated. Set the temperatures moderately–not too high to run up energy costs, but not so cold that your home is adversely affected. If you are away, consider keeping cabinet doors where pipes are housed open to allow warm air circulation to keep them from freezing. Also, consider allowing a small trickle of water to run out of the faucets and down the pipes.

    Keep Emergency Supplies

    An essential part of adverse weather preparation is to maintain a supply of emergency materials. In the cold of winter, this includes things like alternative heat sources such as generators, lanterns, and portable heaters, or fireplaces. Having a wood burning fireplace can be a great benefit in the winter–particularly if you lose power–but there are other solutions if you don’t. Always ensure that you have plenty of warm bedding and clothing on hand. Keeping a power generator can be a good idea if you have an emergency need for power. These can be useful if power is down for a number of days as well. Beyond heat sources, make sure you have a supply of food for at least one week and plenty of water. Other items such as: flashlights, batteries, first aid kits, shovels, ice melt, and battery or solar powered radios are all good items to have available for a storm.

    Beyond keeping a supply of essential items to combat winter weather, monitoring the forecasts and taking caution when leaving the house are all good practices. During a severe storm and arctic temperatures, staying indoors is especially important. The recent scourge of record cold across the U.S is an example of the importance of staying prepared.

    SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge is Northeastern Pennsylvania leading specialty cleaning company and we are happy to supply you with these simple tips. Should you experience a weather disaster give SERVPRO of Carbondale/Clarks Summit/Old Forge a call. Proudly serving all of Lackawanna, Luzerne, Wayne, Wyoming and Susquehanna counties